Tag Archives: participation

Get Involved in a Brigade Action Team

A first version of priorities and a draft rally cry are some of the key items that Code for America Brigades should be excited about as we start 2017. But what’s really exciting for me are the opportunities for making connections across the brigade network. Which is why the National Advisory Committee needs brigade members to help us by joining some of our Brigade Action Teams.

As many of you know, I have the honor of serving on the Code for America Brigade National Advisory Committee or NAC for short. There are eight other passionate members of the group who have had several meetings over the last few weeks to help set priorities, draft a rally cry (see image to the right), and identify working groups we call Brigade Action Teams (BAT). We’ve worked closely with Code for America staff and an amazing consultant who helped us navigate several exercises to move the group forward. Continue reading

Hey RTP: Get involved in open government

open govt - Image credits opensource.com

Image credits opensource.com

I gave the latest iteration of my “Open source all the cities talk” (slides) at BarCampRDU on Saturday May 18, 2013. When I got to my slide on how to get involved, someone in the room asked me if this was posted on the web. And I was like….no, but that’s a great idea.

There are a number of events or ways you can make our local government in the Triangle region more transparent, enhance citizen participation, or improve collaboration between citizens and government or regionally between municipalities. Here are a few events coming up and some other ways to get started. Continue reading

City Council Has Perfect Attendance at CityCamp Raleigh

Originally posted on opensource.com and licensed under Creative Commons BY-SA.

What started with a unanimous vote to adopt an open source resolution eventually became a long-term commitment to the open source way. How many of you have had an elected official attend a citizen-lead event? Probably some of you. But how many of you have had your entire city or town council attend an unconference?

At a recent open government unconference, all city council members—including the mayor of Raleigh, North Carolina—attended some or all of the event. Their attendance wasn’t a requirement—and it wasn’t a political drive-by. It was genuine, natural. And some of them got knee-deep in the “code,” competing in the civic hackathon. Continue reading

Ten Teams Compete for CityCamp Raleigh $5000 Prize

The unconference at CityCamp Raleigh on June 2 was amazing. The ideas. The passion. The people. For those of you unfamiliar with the unconference format, we gathered at 9:00 am  on Saturday. The coffee was a little late, so we didn’t start until 9:15 am. We explained the process for the day…which went something like this: Continue reading

A Preview of the CityCamp Raleigh Agenda

Here’s a peak at the agenda for Friday, June 1. Lunch will be provided from 12-1pm. There will also be a chance to network during this time. You should register so we know you’re coming.

On Saturday, June 2, we will kick off our unconference at 9am–where the agenda will be determined by those in attendance. Folks will pitch ideas to start off the morning, several workshops will be hosted, and teams will start to form around ideas on how to improve civic engagement or other civic-minded needs in the City of Raleigh.

On Sunday, June 3, starting at 9am, teams will collaborate on solving a civic issue that can improve the quality of life in Raleigh. Simultaneously, CityCamp Raleigh will host a Triangle Wiki content sprint to add pages, images, and ideas to trianglewiki.org. At 3pm, teams will present and CityCamp Raleigh will award one winning team with a cash reward at 4pm. Continue reading

Represent Wake County on transit, not yourself

Just sent this note to all the Wake County Commissioners. Transparency +1

You can email them too: joe.bryan@wakegov.com, paul.coble@wakegov.com, bward@wakegov.com, james.west@wakegov.com, phil.matthews@wakegov.com, Tony.Gurley@wakegov.com, ervin.portman@wakegov.com

Subject: Represent Wake County on transit, not yourself Continue reading

How SPARKcon uses open source

Originally posted on opensource.com and licensed under Creative Commons BY-SA.

Image credits: h0tgrits, opensource.com - Licensed CC-BY-SA

Process over content. Aly Khalifa from Gamil Design and Designbox used this mantra to instill open source roots at SPARKcon—an annual event that showcases, celebrates, and influences the creative momentum naturally found in North Carolina’s Triangle region.

“I think at first it was hard for people to understand—it was hard for us to describe. Sometimes it was embarrassing—this commitment to process over content,” Continue reading

Triangle Wiki Day a Huge Success for Open Source in Raleigh

Image credits: Laura Barnes Hamlyn

Image credits: Laura Barnes Hamlyn

Almost 50 people collaborated on February 25 at Red Hat headquarters, currently located on Centennial Campus in Raleigh, NC, to participate in Triangle Wiki Day. The event was a soft launch of trianglewiki.org, an effort to document the Triangle region and increase collaboration and knowledge sharing across the area. The wiki uses open source software, local wiki, as a content management platform that includes wiki pages, images, and mapping.

The day started off with a brief presentation [PDF] by Jason Hibbets on how the Triangle Wiki project fits in with the CityCamp Raleigh movement, as well as the larger open government picture and civic innovation week, Code Across America, by Code for America. Continue reading

CityCamp Honolulu Recap

Originally posted on opensource.com and guest posted on sunlightfoundation.com.

The theme that emerged from the first CityCamp Honolulu, held on December 3 (the 17th CityCamp held worldwide), was restoring citizen confidence in their government. In a very collaborative and participatory atmosphere, organizers looked to citizens to generate ideas for the City of Honolulu’s upcoming Code for America project and to harness the power of design thinking to rapidly prototype ten topics generated during the unconference. Continue reading

Creating a citizen movement for open government

GOVT_citizens

CC-BY-SA opensource.com

How do you get techies, govies, and citizens to identify, collaborate, and start creating solutions for your local government? Host a CityCamp.

It’s easier than you think. The first CityCamp Raleigh started as a conversation about citizen engagement, but we realized that we could do more than just talk about it. A dozen people came together over 12 weeks to make CityCamp Raleigh a reality. Over 225 people attended three days of collaboration, sharing, and encouraging openness–focusing on improving access to data and solutions for local government.

Three themes emerged over the weekend, all twists on open government: Continue reading